Demolishing St. Pat’s

Herald Opinions Better late than never The derelict former St. Patrick’s High School in Halifax, sitting underutilized since 2007 on prime real estate on Quinpool Road while costing — first the school board and then the city — more than $400,000 a year to run, has long been a poster child for wasteful inaction by local gov­ernment . So moves by Halifax city council this week to approve demolishing the building, and to direct staff to bolster redevelopment of the site, are welcome if overdue. The old high school, renamed Quinpool Education Centre after St. Patrick’s and Queen Elizabeth High…

Fee Flap – Builders Balk at Proposed Charges

Group calls for moratorium on extra costs for development in Halifax area BRETT BUNDALE CITY HALL REPORTER bbundale@herald.ca @CH_bbundale New development charges being considered by Halifax regional council have raised the ire of some homebuilders. The new fee being proposed would cover the costs of develop­ing transit and transportation s ervices for new developments in the region. But the Nova Scotia Home Builders’ Association is calling on council to impose a moratorium on all new fees and taxes on resid­ential constru ction . “Let’s have . . . a sober second look and ask if we’re pricing ourselves out of existence,” Paul…

ST. PATRICK’S HIGH SCHOOL - Way cleared for building’s demolition 

Business association says mixed-use development would be ideal BRETT BUNDALE CITY HALL REPORTER bbundale@herald.ca @CH_bbundale Halifax regional council has de­clared the old St. Patrick’s High School surplus, clearing the way for the demolition of the 1950s building and sale of the property. Tearing down the 265,000-square-foot Quinpool Road school is expected to cost $3.5 million, far less than the estimated $9.5 million it would have cost to upgrade the building. Coun. Jennifer Watts (Halifax Peninsula North) said the high school, which later became the Quinpool Education Centre, was a “very prominent resource in the community for many years.” “It has had a…

Profit Brings Risk for Condominium Corporations

Canada Revenue Agency also scrutinizes industry and professional associations Monday, July 7, 2014 By Barbara Carss Profit motives present risk for condominium corporations, industry and professional associations. Earlier this year, the 2014 federal budget announced a public consultation on the tax framework for non-profit organizations (NPOs), which follows the Canada Revenue Agency’s (CRA) recently completed three-year review of compliance with theIncome Tax Act in the broadly defined sector. After scrutinizing 1,330 filers — deemed a statistically representative sample of the approximately 30,000 organizations that submit tax returns claiming an exemption — the CRA concluded a “significant portion” were offside with the…