Study: Utilities could collaborate

Muskrat Falls project offers chance to share resources on power lines, reser ves JOANN ALBERSTAT MICHAEL GORMAN STAFF REPORTERS Muskrat Falls could be a catalyst for more regional co-operation on electricity, says a new study by the Atlantic Institute for Market Stud­ies. The paper, released Thursday, concludes that transmission links being built for the $6.9-billion hydro project in Labrador should spur the Atlantic provinces and their electrical utilities to work together more. Gordon Weil, the think-tank’s senior fellow on electricity policy, said power line expansion — in­cluding the $1.5-billion Maritime Link — could be used to make the region’s grid…

Altus aims to aid small N.S. firms

BRUCE ERSKINE BUSINESS REPORTER  berskine@herald.ca @CH_Br uceErskine Altus Securities Inc. sees oppor­tunities in Nova Scotia by going where the big banks fear to tread. “We think there’s room for an independent dealer to raise money and finance smaller Nova Scotia-based enterprises,” said Paul Jelec, the Toronto company’s president and chief financial officer, in an interview Wednes­day in Halifax. “Studies have shown that smaller entities produce, on a per capita basis, more jobs than the big guys.” Altus, which was founded in 1996, acquired the Halifax retail operations of Jennings Capital Inc . in early 2012. “The main reason we opened…

More supportive housing needed, social worker says

CLARE MELLOR STAFF REPORTER  cmellor@herald.ca @CH-cmellor More low-income and supportive housing is needed in Halifax Regional Municipality to meet the needs of mothers and children, says the social work co-ordinator for Adsum House. “We don’t have nearly enough low-income housing in Halifax — actual low-income, (for) people on income assistance,” Megan Gray said. “There is a lot of what is called affordable housing, but it is above what people can afford on income assistance.” One-hundred-fifty-four women stayed at the Adsum House emer­gency shelter between Sept 30, 2013, and the end of last month. It helps women and children. “Fourteen of those,…

COMPOSTING PLAN – Leachate proposal smells bad for many

FRANCES WILLICK STAFF REPORTER   fwillick@herald.ca @fwillick What’s surprising about Halifax’s municipal composting facility is not so much the intensity of the smells, but rather the variety of them . Climbing the stairwell into a sanitized, office-like viewing area, the heady, fermented scent hits you, prompting an involuntary “Ooof!” as you brace yourself for your next breath. Mountains of organic commer­cial and residential waste — cab­bage leaves, plant stalks, bits of paper and even a Bud Light box — await their trip up to a screening platform, where workers decked out in protective gear and respirat­ory filters sort through the com­post…